January 7, 2018

Wedding Photography

Unique wedding photography: how to avoid clichés?

Photography

Whatever you read, here or on any other blog, remember one thing. Photography is a numbers’ game. A game of practice. Even if we would set you up with an amazing shot to make at your next wedding, chances are it wouldn’t be that good.

So, go out there with a mindset of an adventure and practice. And practice some more.

Key No.1 – Find your character

Don’t worry, it’s not something you should develop on the first day. But the truth is, the easiest way to avoid clichés is to develop your own character, instinct and style. Take your time, focus on the target’s perspective but try adding something of your own.

Have you tried the rain of glitter? Or the through the glass-upside down effect? Or come up with your own experiments.

Then, even if it’s a cliché, it’s one of your own.

Key No.2 – Learn the structure

Yes, even if that mean pictures of newlyweds under a tree holding hands or the good ol’ bridesmaids carrying the groom’ shot. To up your game as a photographer, you must know the rules before you break them (look at me – throwing clichés in an article teaching how to avoid them).

PhotographyKey No.3 – Get ready

One thing you don’t have at the wedding is time. So, as much planning that can be done, should be done. Even if it’s not in your contract, make the extra mile. Get to the event early or the day before and plan your shots. Plus, if the site is getting ready, it’s a great time to make delightful pre-event shots.

There is nothing worse than to stand around while the photographer is trying to figure out the shot.

Tip: if you are a day early, think about where the Sun will be during the event.

Key No.4 – Talk to the clients

This should go without saying but clients come first. They may not be educated in photography, so take time to explain, but in the end, what they ask is what you should deliver. If they are looking for some simple, ‘off to a journey of lifetime’ pictures you should either not work with that client or do what they ask, even if that means making your peace with clichés.